Exploring STC MCU part 6 – Feeling the environment

STC microcontrollers sometimes comes with built-in ADC. It can be a little bit tricky to use as the relevant pins have to be switched between analog and digital mode.

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Exploring STC MCU part 4 – Better times

Remember back in part 3 I wrote the timing code? That code only works with a 24MHz clock. And I didn’t have the watchdog running yet. So I am gonna fix it.

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Exploring STC MCU part 3.5 – bug explained

The bug I encountered on STC15W4K61S4 is resolved: this chip, being much more complicated than the traditional 8051 my textbooks was written for, have a bit of quirks that can break code compatibility between them.

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Exploring STC MCU Part 3 – Samples, bugs, and the first lines of code

I am digging deeper into the STC 8051 ecosystem by attempting to write my first bits of actual code on this platform. This experiment took me a few days to execute as I need to wrestle a few bugs along the way, and ended up getting me ordering a few samples from STC directly.

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Exploring STC MCU Part 2 – So how fast is it?

STC proudly claims that their MCU are fast. And from what I see in their core clock timing table they have a new core design that accelerated the instructions a lot. So how fast is it? Continue reading Exploring STC MCU Part 2 – So how fast is it?

Exploring STC MCU Part 1 – The chips

It seem to me that there are some interest in ultra cheap microcontrollers. The Chinese brand STC makes a few 8051-compatible MCU which sells at ridiculously cheap prices.

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CGIKit JSON RPC Library for iOS

This library allows you to call to your servers using HTTP(S) and pass arguments using JSON objects, just as if it is part of your Objective-C library. This library is pretty small, with under 700 lines of condensed magic of code that involves frequent calls to the underlying runtime libraries of Objective-C, to keep this entire library function by injecting code dynamically to the runtime.

This version of library used Objective-C Method Forwarding mechanism to inject code. A future version will use runtime manipulation, making it impossible to change the runtime protocol but faster to use.